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Soukenberi

BRAND SPOTLIGHT: Soukenberi

The Beauty Marketplace had an enlightening call with Suk Chan Candle and Scent Developer, Founder of Soukenberi – a personal fragrance line for you and your space. From clean, refreshing, and invigorating Eucalyptus Tea, to light and lifting Lemon Sandalwood; Soukenberi fragrances captivate your senses.

Suk Chan has an interesting career path which began in R&D for International Fashion where she spent many years at Donna Karan sourcing production overseas. Looking to do something else, and always having a nose for scent and mixing different things, Suk decided to look into candle making. She played with scents first for a year to a year and half, and that was when she encountered the nirvana moment of finding her passion.

The Harmon Hotel in Las Vegas commissioned her to create a scent for the hotel which the company was to use in different variations, however, the hotel encountered infrastructure issues and required demolition.  Out of this twist in fate, Suk found joy because she knew this was something she could do for the rest of her life moving forward.

Soukenberi

Suk developed her own line, self-titled according to her nickname, Soukenberi, and her company’s mission is to bring joy via their products. The Soukenberi line is presently distributed in luxury spas and retailers in Brooklyn, Chicago, Seattle, Oklahoma, and Cape Cod. Read more about each product on the Soukenberi website HERE

Have An Honestly Beautiful Day!

Footmate

FANCY FEET

A special thank-you to our friends over at FootMate who set us their innovative foot scrubbing product just in time for the New York City Tri-Athlon this past weekend. If you are an athlete or simply like to pamper your feet this is the product to have:

 

Footmate

WHO – FootMate

WHAT – The FootMate System is a complete foot care system for cleaning, soothing, stimulating, and massaging your feet.

WHEN – Every time you shower!

WHERE – The FootMate product comes with suction cups that sick to the base of your bathtub or shower.

WHY – To keep your feet callus free and healthy.

How – Suction, Squirt, and Scrub – Just suction the bristles in your shower, squirt the Footmate Rejuvenating Gel, and Scrub those toes.

Have An Honestly Beautiful Day!

Wink

JUNE BREAKOUT BRAND

A huge trend in the beauty industry at the moment is long, extravagant eyelashes. Women are willing to invest in eye lash extensions, splurge at the Sephora counter devoted to false and creative drag-queen style adhesives, and medical aesthetic companies, such as Latisse and RapidLash, offer chemical growth substances to facilitate longer lash growth.

As we were following the long lash trend, The Beauty Marketplace discovered a budding start up out of MIT we were so impressed by, we decisded to name them June’s Breakout Brand. The The Beauty Marketplace Breakout Brand of the Month is Wink Natural Cosmetics.

Wink

Founded in June 2013, Wink Natural Cosmetics is solving beauty problems, such as short eye lashes, with real science and natural ingredients. Megan Cox, Founder of Wink, developed their first product,  an eyelash and eyebrow enhancer, because she was investing thousands of dollars on eyelash extensions which were only damaging her lashes. Wink Eyelash EnhancerAfter looking into other lash growth serums and options, she was turned off by the scary chemical side effects thus prompting  her to create her own serum that was both safe for use, as well as effective. Wink Natural Cosmetics’ eyelash enhancer offers a natural and hypoallergenic solution to reactivate dormant hair follicles found on your lashes and brows, delivering a more lush and fuller look.

After developing an all-natural formula, the product began testing and produced great results. According to  Wink’s website, “4 out of 5 of the testing participants had lashes that were 10-20% longer, 100% of them really experienced fuller lashes. All in all, a hypoallergenic formula was developed that: a). was made with the finest all natural ingredients, b). could make your eyelashes longer, c). could grow more lashes and d). could regrow your eyebrows.” What’s better than that?!

According to Ms. Cox, a second product is on the way and slated for a 2015 release. The product, a 2-in-1 brightening and anti-aging eye cream with gold peptides, is currently in testing. Keep checking The Beauty Marketplace and be sure to sign up for our newsletter for more information on the release.

Have an Honestly Beautiful Day!

 

COSMETIC INGREDIENTS DEFINED

The Beauty Marketplace just received our copy of “Milady: Skincare and Cosmetic Ingredients Dictionary” from industry veteran and author Joseph Dinardo. Joseph, a 37 year Cosmetic Industry veteran, penned the book along with his colleague, Varinia Michalun. Dinardo told The Beauty Marketplace, “(Milady) was a perfect way of sharing some of the pearls I have learned over the years with others on my way out and their way into the field of skincare”. The guide offers simple straight forward talk that combines common sense with science in a simple to read format.

Milady

The “Milady: Skincare and Cosmetic Ingredients Dictionary” is more than just a dictionary of cosmetic ingredients, but also a guide to understanding skin types and physiology, as well as how cosmetic products interact with the skin. The book is in three parts: Part 1 including a basic explanation of skin anatomy, Part 2 containing an alphabetical listing of more than 2,600 cosmetic ingredients with definitions, and Part 3 offering the Botanical Latin terms for commonly used ingredients.

What The Beauty Marketplace loves about this book is the guide is useful to industry professionals as well as consumers. Beauty industry executives whose goal is to develop innovative skincare lines and improve the efficacy of existing products will find the dictionary of terms useful as a reference and tool for new formulations. If you are a beauty product consumer who would like to be more knowledgeable on how different ingredients interact with the skin, you will also find the dictionary educational.

Milady, the book’s publisher, is the Premier Source for Education Resources in Cosmetology, Esthetics, Barbering, Nail Technology, Makeup, Massage Therapy, Salon & Spa Management and Business Training. Serving the Beauty and Wellness Industry since 1927. For more information click HERE

Have an Honestly Beautiful Day!

super 7 serum

BREAKOUT BRAND

The The Beauty Marketplace Breakout Brand for May is a new player ultra luxe skincare market: A brand is called IMMUNOCOLOGIE.Imm logo

 

A leader in the BioCosmeceutical Market, giving brands like Le Mer and Le Prarie a run for their money, Immunocologie works with the biology of the skin and offers medicinal properties pertaining to anti-aging.

 

Immunocologie is the only skincare line based on the science of the skin’s immune system. “Your skin is the largest organ in your body, and your immune system is the essential driving force in sustaining vibrant, healthy skin. When you are totally healthy and live in a perfectly pure environment, your skin functions at an optimal metabolic rate, protecting and repairing itself as best as humanly possible. But, we don’t live in a bubble,” says Karen Ballou of Lucas Brand Equity, the equity group at the head of Immunocologie.

 

Every day, internal and external factors affect your skin’s metabolic rate and compromise it’s health. Common skin-hampering internal factors include getting sick, lack of sleep, stress, poor nutrition, allergies and aging. Top external factors are free radical and negative ion exposure brought on by UV rays, pollution, extreme weather changes and electronic device emissions.

 

Immunocologie has brought together the world’s leading chemists and research scientists in the field of Biocosmeceutical Technology and human immune health to create a regimen specifically designed to support the natural processes of your skin’s immune system. Immunocologie uses bio- available plant based actives to help skin cells generate the same “positive skin response” that your skin would experience if internal and external conditions were perfect. The regimen was developed in France and is based on an exclusive French Bio-ferm process, which employs active ingredients to stimulate your skin’s natural immune response, preventing and repairing damage on a cellular level, encouraging a healthy metabolic rate and regulating cell turnover. All active ingredients are backed by in vitro clinical studies.

 

The core ingredient found in all Immunocologie treatments is the brand’s signature Vital Oligo Complex, containing 15 essential elements crucial for the proper functioning of skin cells, and encapsulated in a delivery system that allows it to penetrate into the deeper layers of the skin. Plant-derived peptides and oligopeptides, super anti-oxidants, nourishing oils, hyaluronic acid, vitamins and minerals are all key components of Immunocologie skincare formulations.

 

Immunocologie emphasizes the importance of positive ion therapy. “Pollution and electronic devices, like cell phones, computers and TVs, proliferate negative ions which bring imbalance to your skin. Your skin needs positive ions to function properly. As an example, positive ions are in water—think about how good your skin looks and feels when you walk along the shoreline or after a rainy day when the air is humid,” says Ballou.

 

Recent studies indicate skincare emulsifiers, a common skincare additive used to stabilize creams and lotion by breaking down oils, may  also break down natural oils in your skin, negatively impacting skin barrier function.  All Immunocologie products are free of
emulsifiers and heal the skin from within.

 

Sustainability is paramount to Immunocologie. Since the brand sources natural ingredients from all over the world, Immunocologie operates according to the Nagoya Protocol – a global agreement whose objective is ensuring a fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the use of genetic resources.

 

The Super 7 Elixir Face is the brands breakout product. Made using Snail Mucin. Also known as Snail Slime, this ingredient  is commercially obtained from the common garden snail species Helix aspersa, which produces a secretion rich in proteins of high and low molecular super 7 serumweight hyaluronic acid and antioxidants. The secretion of the snail supposedly has a double function when applied to human skin: on one hand it is claimed to stimulate the formation of collagen, elastin and dermal components that repair the signs of photoaging and, second, is claimed to minimize the damage generated by free radicals that are responsible for premature skin aging. Immunocologie face serum is a daily, strongly effective serum that regenerates skin cells to bring balance to the skin.

 

Immunocologie already has a cult following of socialites and celebrities. The brand can be found at Clyde’s on Manhattan’s Upper East Side and at Whites in East Hampton. Be sure to visit their website at www.immunocologie.com

 

oil

TO PULL OR NOT TO PULL?

A trending beauty topic that has been circling around the office and internet is oil pulling.

Oil pulling or oil swishing is a traditional folk remedy where oil is swished or held in the mouth. Ayurvedic literature states oil pulling is capable of improving oral and systemic health, including a benefit in conditions such as headaches, migraines, diabetes mellitus, asthma, and acne, as well as whitening teeth. Promoters claim it works by “pulling out” “toxins”, and thereby reducing inflammation.

oil

According to an article in The Washington Post, “It’s (oil pulling) been touted as everything from a natural teeth whitener to a cure for acne. Thousands of videos on YouTube espouse the benefits of oil pulling — an Ayurvedic technique that involves swishing an oil in your mouth, much like mouthwash, and spitting it out.

There don’t seem to be any good medical studies on pulling but that hasn’t reduced interest in the technique. For Francheska Medina, a natural-living blogger based in New York, the benefits of oil pulling go beyond oral health. In December, Medina posted an oil pulling video to her YouTube channel, HeyFranHey, which recently hit 100,000 subscribers. In the video, Medina rattles off a list of ailments — migraines, allergies, sinus pressure, cavities and more — before explaining the method, which she calls “an awesome way to jump start your body.”

In a phone interview, Medina said she began pulling oil six years ago after she experienced a series of kidney-related health issues. She does not have a medical background, but began studying nutrition and natural remedies when she found treatments her doctors suggested to be ineffective or too expensive. She still does it first thing every morning.

“I started doing [oil pulling] and within the first two weeks, I could feel my body getting stronger,” said Medina, who also incorporated juicing and detox teas into her health regimen. “I knew that it was definitely going to be something that could help me heal myself.”

If you search for “oil pulling,” on the American Dental Association’s Web site, you won’t find much. As The Atlantic notes, the organization addresses alternative methods in a much more general way, with a policy statement on “unconventional dentistry.”

Sally J. Cram, a D.C.-based periodontist and a consumer adviser for the ADA, said she hasn’t seen any studies on oil pulling during her 28 years in dentistry. Oil pulling is often cited as a natural breath freshener, and while Cram says the fragrance of certain oils may help, “there’s nothing in those oils that is anti-bacterial.”

Kasia Kines, a licensed nutritionist whose Baltimore-based practice is built around holistic nutrition says she often recommends oil pulling to clients as part of her 30- day detox program, which includes a focus on plant-based whole foods, such as whole grains, vegetables and seeds. She doesn’t do it herself, however, because her plant-based diet keeps her healthy, she said.

Kines, a native of Poland, said her mother taught her the technique using sunflower oil. Because the oil is relatively inexpensive, Kines says, “it’s very, very practical,” though she admits it’s not for everyone.

Those who recommend the technique usually suggest swishing the oil for 10-15 minutes. “For many Americans, it’s not very palatable,” Kines said.

An article from The Atlantic states, “A Google search for “oil pulling” brings up more than two million results, many from the past few weeks. This late February post on the blog Fashionlush, received around 800 comments. The main claims being bandied about are that the practice cleans and whitens your teeth, helps with bad breath, and eases jaw pain. More dubious are the assertions that it cures diabetes, hangovers, acne, and all manner of other bodily ills. (A good rule to live by, I think, is not to trust anything that claims to get rid of “toxins,” especially if it does not specify what these toxins are. “We have these magic organs called kidneys and livers and [detoxifying] is what they do,” Collins says. “We don’t necessarily need to be swishing things around in our mouth.”)

There have been a handful of studies on the practice (published in Indian journals, it’s worth noting) that found it to be equally or nearly as effective as mouthwash in reducing halitosis, plaque-induced gingivitis, and the presence of streptococcus mutans, a bacteria that contributes to tooth decay. But these studies had very small sample sizes—20 people total—which makes them, Collins says, “one step away from case studies.”

When I contacted the American Dental Association, I was told it could not comment on the practice “because additional research is needed.” The organization pointed me to its statement on “unconventional dentistry,” which reads in part:

The ADA… supports those diagnostic and treatment approaches that allow both patient and dentist to make informed choices among safe and effective options. The provision of dental care should be based on sound scientific principles and demonstrated clinical safety and effectiveness. Oil pulling is far from a sound scientific principle. Collins says that, in his opinion, there’s no harm in it (though if you swallow it, he posits you might have some gastrointestinal issues), but neither is there any solid evidence of benefits.

“From a public health point of view, we certainly do not want to encourage people to use things that, while they may be harmless, we have no evidence that they work,” Collins says. “It’s kind of like chiropractic. If somebody feels that they can go to the chiropractor, get a back adjustment, and it makes them feel better, I’m okay with that. If people start selling chiropractic as a mechanism to cure cancer then I have a problem with that.”

Basically, if you feel that swishing oil between your teeth for 20 minutes a day is a good use of your time, it probably can’t hurt you. But don’t use it as an alternative to brushing your teeth, and certainly don’t expect it to cure any real conditions. No matter what the movie stars say.”

Our honest perspective? Oil pulling has received little study and there is little evidence to support claims made by the technique’s advocates. We welcome your updates, testimonials, and feedback here!

 

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AWARD SEASON SKINNY

How do celebrities like Naomi Watts, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Kate Hudson stay super slender during award season?

According to People magazine, they cleanse. A cleanse is a program of juices and/or whole foods to help remove toxins from the body.

Cleansing replaces regular meals giving the digestive system a chance to rest, allowing the body to heal and restore balance. Some cleansers report modest weight loss and glowing skin.

The most popular juice cleanses among celebrities right now are Organic Avenue, BluePrint, Cooler Cleanse, and Suja.